LAMM AT LARGE: Alabama Over SEC

LAMM AT LARGE: Alabama Over SEC

By: David Lamm

The critics and the players scream greed when NFL owners talk about expanding the regular season to 18 games.

Money . . money . . . money.

They’re right. The owners are a greedy bunch who’d sell their mothers for a profit.

But isn’t this a classic case of the pot calling the kettle black, or any other similar cliché you can come up with?

What group is greedier than the players? This isn’t being critical about getting all you can. That’s the American way. But when’s the last time the players did anything that wouldn’t put money in their pockets?

Most of those who are against 18 games cite safety seasons. Most of those are savvy veterans looking for ways to prolong their lucrative careers.

Both sides are making obscene amounts of money. The public’s thirst for the NFL seems endless.
I don’t know how 18 games instead of 16 will impact the players’ bodies, but I bet we find out sooner than later.

Alabama Over SEC

The Southeastern Conference is the strongest conference in college football. It isn’t even close. So, why does it feel like it belongs to Alabama?

What SEC fan doesn’t expect the Crimson Tide to win the SEC title this year? There are some frustrated Georgia fans, of course, who are certain this is finally the year their team gets the Tide. There are high expectations at Florida, but are the Gators ready to knock off the Nick Saban-coached juggernaut?

What Alabama has done has put together one of the greatest runs in college football history. Saban has turned the program into a major NFL training ground and this season looks no different.

Traditionally, even the greatest programs have their down cycles. Consistently staying on top is more difficult these days with players leaving school early for the NFL draft or transferring.

Not Alabama. Saban rescued the program in 2007. He started 6-6, losing a home game to Louisiana-Monroe. His team reached the SEC Championship game in Year 2 and has been in seven of 12 since.

Now, in spite of the SEC’s might, there’s no end in sight.